Skip to main content

Contribution of Three (3) Medicinal Plants of Senegalese Flora in the Management of Sickle Cell Disease | Chapter 07 | Advances in Applied Science and Technology Vol. 4

Sickle cell disease is a major public health problem in Africa and many other areas across the world. Many  drugs  that  are  available  for  treating  the  disease  are  insufficiently  effective,  toxic,  or  too expensive. Therefore, there is a pressing need for safe, effective, and inexpensive therapeutic agents from  indigenous  plants  used  in  traditional  medicines.  In  Senegal,  a  lot  of  plants  are  proposed  by traditional healers to manage the sickle cell disease, among them Combretum glutinosum, Leptadenia hastate and Maytenus senegalensis.  These plants were studied in this work. Methanolic and ethyl acetate extracts of part of these plants were evaluated on SS sickles type to determine their anti-sickling potential. Antiradical properties of methanolic extract of C glutinosum were evaluated using the  DPPH  radical  as  oxidant.  Total  phenolic  content  of  the  methanol  extract  was  determined. Phytochemical screening of the crude extract of methanol revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, phenols, anthracenics and flavonoids. Results show a good antisickling effect of methanol extracts with a maximum antisickling revers of 72, 80 and 81% for respectively M senegalensis, L hastateand C glutinosumat 10 mg/mL in 120 min incubation while ethyl acetate extract at the same conditions has 62, 66 and 77% of sickling reverse. Arginine used as the positive reference has 67% sickling reverse activity at 120 min of incubation. The measured IC50 were 0.65 and 0.163 for respectively the methanol  extract  and  ascorbic  acid.  Antiradical  powers  0.155  and  0.62  respectively  for  methanol extract and ascorbic acid were calculated from the effective concentrations. The results of this study confirm the traditional use these three plants in the management of sickle cell disease.

Author(s) Details

Pr. Cheikh Sall
Laboratory of Chemistry, Training and Research Unit of Health, Thies University, PB 967 Thies, Sénégal.

Pr Matar Seck
Laboratory of Organic and Therapeutic Chemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology (F.M.P.O.), Cheikh Anta Diop University (U.C.A.D.), PB 5005 Dakar-Fann, Sénégal.

Rokhaya Sylla Gueye
Laboratory of Organic and Therapeutic Chemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology (F.M.P.O.), Cheikh Anta Diop University (U.C.A.D.), PB 5005 Dakar-Fann, Sénégal.

Tandakha Ndiaye Dieye
Laboratory of Immunology, Pharmacy and Odontology (F.M.P.O.), Cheikh Anta Diop University (U.C.A.D.), Sénégal.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

A Brief Study of Middleware Technologies: Programming Applications and Management Systems | Chapter 15 | Novel Research Aspects in Mathematical and Computer Science Vol. 1

  Many platforms, services, applications, hardware, and operating systems are connected through the middleware layer. Because the middleware layer abstracts much low-level complexity and makes applications and software systems portable, it allows disparate systems to interface and function together in harmony. Middleware technologies enable software engineers to swiftly construct software systems and applications, allowing developers to focus on more important tasks. This chapter examines several types of middleware systems and discusses middleware capabilities, middleware operation, middleware's function in cloud-based systems, and the best middleware platforms to use. Middleware systems are widely utilised and can be found in practically any software system or application. Middleware programmes provide as a link between many sorts of systems and protocols. They serve as a mechanism for various systems. To successfully exchange information, it runs on a variety of operating system

A Prospective Study about Safety and Efficacy of Perioperative Lidocaine Infusion | Chapter 09 | New Horizons in Medicine and Medical Research Vol. 8

 Opioids cause clinically significant side effects such as respiratory depression, immunosuppression, muscle rigidity, negative inotropism, nausea, vomiting, hyperalgesia, urine retention, postoperative ileus, and drowsiness. Perioperative opioids are a major contributor to the United States' and other countries' opioid epidemics. Non-opioid analgesics, particularly lidocaine, are becoming more common for perioperative use as a result of this. A total of 185 adult patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control group I (105 patients) [fentanyl group] or group ii (80 patients) [opioid-free anaesthesia group]. Lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg bolus followed by 1.5 mg/kg/h infusion intraoperatively, and 1.5-2 mg/kg/h infusion for 2-8 hours postoperatively were given to patients in both groups at anaesthetic induction. Intraoperatively, both groups received analgesic adjuvants such as diclofenac 75 mg, paracetamol 1 gm, and mgso4 30-50 mg/kg. If the mean arterial pressure (map)

A Case Report on Delayed Diagnosis of Glioblastoma | Chapter 07 | New Horizons in Medicine and Medical Research Vol. 8

  The clinical and radiological indications of a concomitant tumour may be hidden by the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. The goal of this study is to raise awareness about the dangers of delayed diagnosis by recounting the case of a patient who had a subarachnoid haemorrhage that hid the presence of a glioblastoma for several months. Only a few similar cases have been recorded in the literature: The therapy of two recent severe neurosurgical illnesses is discussed in this article. Author(S) Details Gabriele Ronchetti Department of Neurosurgery, Ospedale San Giovanni Bosco, ASL Cittá di Torino, Italy. Carlo Giussani Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, San Gerardo Hospital, University of Milano Bicocca, via Pergolesi 33, 20900, Monza, Italy. View Book:- https://stm.bookpi.org/NHMMR-V8/article/view/6645